Tom Sullivan Legacy Society. Four images of smiling preschoolers who are visually impaired.

The Tom Sullivan Legacy Society recognizes and honors those who have made, or intend to make, an estate-related gift to the Blind Children’s Center. When you include us in your estate plan, you leave a legacy of care, support and light to children with visual impairments and their families. Benefits of Legacy Society membership include optional recognition on our donor wall and in printed materials, and invitations to special gatherings and events. By joining our Legacy Society today and sharing your gift intentions with us, you ensure that your gift is directed according to your wishes in the future.

We invite you to join the Tom Sullivan Legacy Society by designating a portion of your estate to the Blind Children’s Center. While every member of our Legacy Society shares a dedication to our children and families, we recognize that every act of giving is personal and unique. When you are considering a significant gift, it is always advisable to weigh the costs and benefits of giving cash, securities, property, or business interests. Blind Children’s Center has the flexibility and resources to accept a wide range of assets.

Additionally, Blind Children’s Center works with Bank of America Private Bank Philanthropic Solutions and can connect you with an expert who will share more about gift vehicles and their associated tax advantages, and work with you and your advisors on meeting your long-term financial and charitable goals.

To learn more, join, or be connected to an expert, please contact Scott Kassel, Director of Development, at (323) 664-2153 or scott@blindchildrenscenter.org.

The information provided here is not intended as tax, legal or financial advice, nor can we provide such advice to you. You should discuss any charitable gift with your professional financial advisor.

A smiling man in a suit

Tom Sullivan was born blind due to complications from prematurity. Educated at Perkins School for the Blind, followed by Providence College and Harvard University, he has forged an incredible career in entertainment ranging from appearances on the Johnny Carson Show to a national anthem performance at the Super Bowl. Tom has leveraged his public profile to become a passionate advocate for children facing blindness and the teachers who open their hearts to help them learn and grow.

In 1979, Tom visited the Blind Children’s Center where he met a family whose daughter was just three months old. “It was the first time I held a blind baby, and it changed my life,” Tom remembered. “The Center’s child psychologist told me what great potential this little girl and every student had. Here was a baby who was just like I was years earlier. It had all come full circle.”

Tom became a champion for the Blind Children’s Center, impressed by the inclusive setting and inspired by the loving, caring environment. “Every student here is embraced and empowered to reach for their dreams,” Tom said. Over the past 40 years, he has worked tirelessly to raise funds in support of our mission, and in the future, his legacy will continue to support our work through his intended planned gift.